Science of dating trees

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Overlapping and correlating rings have been used to produce “chronologies” of past years.Linear sequences of rings are obtained by cross-matching tree ring patterns from living trees and those from older dead wood.A well-known study involved bristlecone pine trees in California’s White Mountains, but others have employed oak trees in south Germany and pine trees from Northern Ireland.Most chronologies only go back a few centuries, but a few give longer ages than the Bible seems to allow, supposedly up to 10,000 years or so. Year-to-year variation in the width of rings records information about the growth conditions in the particular year.Example: analyzing the effects of air pollution on tree growth by studying changes in ring widths over time.

I've designed these pages to be easily understood by people at all levels of education, from elementary school students to high school students, from first grade teachers to college professors.You won't find the fancy Flash-driven pages here anymore — I want these pages to be readable, enjoyable, and (most of all) educational for all, especially those with learning and physical disabilities.My goal is to make available as much information about dendrochronology as I can possibly find on the Internet, from the basics of tree-ring dating, to reference and bibliographic information, to products and supplies, to books, and more!Example: analyzing ring widths of trees to determine how much rainfall fell per year long before weather records were kept.The science that uses tree rings to study factors that affect the earth's ecosystems.

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